Featured Image -- 279

Originally posted on The Academe Blog:
? Chandler, Raymond.  The Long Goodbye.  Boston: Houghton, 1954. In creating Philip Marlowe, Raymond Chandler followed the model that Dashiell Hammett provided in Sam Spade.  Both are hardboiled detectives who expect the worst of most people and are seldom proven to be overly pessimistic.  Both operate on the dangerous…

Featured Image -- 277

Originally posted on The Academe Blog:
Capote, Truman.  In Cold Blood.  New York: Random House, 1966. With In Cold Blood, Truman Capote not only established himself as a major voice among writers of his generation, but also created the prototype for several new genres.  The book has been classified as a “true crime” book, a…

Featured Image -- 275

Originally posted on The Academe Blog:
Burke, James Lee.  A Morning for Flamingoes.  Boston: Little, Brown, 1990. In James Lee Burke’s novels featuring Dave Robicheaux, the Louisiana setting is a character as vividly drawn as the protagonist himself. The bayou country is, at once, a lush paradise and the dismal swamp. The plantation architecture harks…

Featured Image -- 273

Originally posted on The Academe Blog:
After this past week’s penultimate episode, it is clear that the crime that set much of the current action in motion occurred two decades earlier. During the 1992 L.A. race riots, several corrupt Vinci police officers committed an armed robbery of a jewelry store, with the most conspicuous loot…

Featured Image -- 271

Originally posted on The Academe Blog:
The obituaries for Omar Sharif have understandably focused on his performances in Lawrence of Arabia and Dr. Zhivago. Over his long career, Sharif may not have done quite enough films, whether notable or not, to stand as one of the greatest actors of the 20th century, but very few…

Featured Image -- 269

Originally posted on The Academe Blog:
Bloch, Robert.  Psycho.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 1959. The enduring popularity of Alfred Hitchcock’s film adaptation has insured that Psycho will remain the novvel with which Robert Bloch is most identified.  Much of the substantial body of work that Bloch produced belongs to the horror genre and other…

Featured Image -- 267

Originally posted on The Academe Blog:
Ball, John.  In the Heat of the Night.  New York: Harper, 1965. John Ball’s most memorable creation, the African-American police detective Virgil Tibbs, was the protagonist of six novels and five films, most of which were not based on Ball’s novels.  In the Heat of the Night, the first…

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.