Monthly Archives: June 2014

National (In-)Security: Fifty Notable American Espionage Novels: 20-22.

Originally posted on ACADEME BLOG:
Ignatius, David Reynolds.  Agents of Innocence.  New York: Norton, 1987. David Reynolds Ignatius is a journalist who has reported for the Wall Street Journal on subjects ranging from the challenges facing the U.S. steel industry to the corrosive conflicts in the Middle East, to the clandestine activities of the C.I.A. …

National (In-)Security: Fifty Notable American Espionage Novels: 17-19.

Originally posted on ACADEME BLOG:
Hood, William Joseph.  Spy Wednesday.  .New York: Norton, 1986. A former C.I.A. station chief, Hood first came to attention with his nonfiction book, Mole (1982).  It chronicled Hood’s part in the decision by Soviet operative Pyotr Popov to become a double-agent, the details of the operation which went undetected for…

A Simply Awful Implicit Equivalency—even if Digitally Generated

Originally posted on ACADEME BLOG:
As colleges and universities struggle to formulate effective policies for dealing with sexual assaults on campus, the media have often focused on the campus culture that blurs the lines between sexual license and sexual imposition. But the same insensitivity to distinctions is also pervasive in our media, often to an…

National (In-)Security: Fifty Notable American Espionage Novels: 14-16.

Originally posted on ACADEME BLOG:
Guild, Nicholas M.  The Summer Soldier.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 1978. Guild has taught at Clemson University and Ohio State University.  He has written almost a dozen novels, many dealing with espionage. For The Summer Soldier, Guild received the Ohioana Book Award.  The novel focuses on a retired C.I.A.…

National (In-)Security: Fifty Notable American Espionage Novels: 11-13.

Originally posted on ACADEME BLOG:
Gilman, Dorothy.  The Amazing Mrs. Pollifax.  New York: Doubleday, 1970. Under her full name, Dorothy Gilman Butters wrote a dozen well-received novels for young adults from 1949 to 1963.  Then, in her mid-forties, she shifted gears considerably, developing a series of adult suspense stories around the quiet adventures of an…

National (In-)Security: Fifty Notable American Espionage Novels: 8-10.

Originally posted on ACADEME BLOG:
Cooper, James Fenimore.  The Spy.  1821. James Fenimore Cooper produced novels that became prototypes for several genres of popular fiction.  In fact, his significance as an influence in this regard has a great deal to do with the resurgence in broader critical interest in his work. The Spy is the…

National (In-)Security: Fifty Notable American Espionage Novels: 6-7.

Originally posted on ACADEME BLOG:
Clancy, Tom.  The Cardinal of the Kremlin.  New York: Putnam, 1984. Tom Clancy’s novels have proved so popular that they have spawned a large number and range of imitators.  Bridging the action-adventure and espionage genres, Clancy’s novels have come to define a new genre, the techno-thriller.  Most of Clancy’s novels…